Burnt Out

My [magic streak](http://vjarmy.com/archives/2006/09/the_incredible_invincible_hard_d.php) has not held up.

Buttons Checks His RSS Feeds

I came home tonight to a faint scent that I could not place. It smelled warm – perhaps my landlord had decided today was the day to turn on our heat. Our heaters are electric, and they always smelled a bit odd.

I did not take the hint that my iMac was off, even when I knew full well that it was still alive and online not 90 minutes beforehand. I rebooted without thinking.
The message struck home when I got up thirty minutes later and noticed that it, again, was off. This time, I sat and watched it reboot. The login screen appeared normally, but not a second after I attempted to type, *boom*. Darkness. I subsequently pulled open the casing and, while I could not locate any particular source of the damage, the burning smell was confirmed to be coming from somewhere on the motherboard; most likely, a blown capacitor.
There is some irony to this. I have been aware that due to my technolust, I have what has been deemed by others to be an absurd upgrade cycle for my hardware. Alternating every year, Katie or I have replaced our primary hardware:

*2000* – I purchase a Mac Cube. It actually held up terribly well.
*2001* – Katie receives her first iBook, a G3/500.
*2002* – I received my iMac G4 as a graduation present.
*2003* – Katie replaces her iBook with an iBook G4/800. This is the first Mac hardware we purchase on our own.
*2004* – I replace my iMac G4 with an iMac G5/1.8GHz.
*2005* – Katie replaces her iBook G4, which had now ground to a halt, with another iBook G4/1.42GHz. This happens enough in advance of the introduction of the MacBook that I don’t feel completely shafted.

This year was the year I had promised to break this cycle. The year I was sure my iMac G5 was not going to start feeling uncontrollably slow, even while I picked up a MacBook Pro at work and had a very direct comparison with the latest and greatest.

But no, the hardware had to die through natural causes. Now my hand has been forced, and I will be trekking to the Apple Store this weekend to take what has become a mandatory upgrade.

  • Tony

    If you look at it with a more positive attitude you can say that you keep up with Apple hardware.

  • You two are the poster children for AppleCare.

  • Don’t pretend you’re disappointed. :P

  • Tony – yes, in some sick and twisted way, you could consider that to be true.
    Mark – save my current predicament, none of these machines were replaced out of need of repair, they were all for entirely selfish reasons.
    Pker – I am, to be honest; I was trying to squirrel away money for other things, and while I don’t doubt I’ll be buying this machine on my Apple Credit Account, it’s still another large log on the fire of my finances.

  • blu9

    Could your iMac be covered by one of these repair extensions?
    http://www.apple.com/support/imac/repairextensionprogram/
    http://www.apple.com/support/imac/powersupply/repairextension/
    If so, getting the thing fixed could be free.

  • You two are the poster children for AppleCare.