VJ ARMY

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Contents

VJ Army

Song Information

Artist: good-cool
BPM: 135 - 160
Genre: All-Mix (Drum'n'bass / Techno / Trance / 2 Step)
VJ: shiro / HES / GOLI / VJ GYO
First Appeared On: AC 6th style
Length: 1:54

Lyrics

Steppin' into the groove
Steppin' into the groove
Baby I don't care
No I don't care any more
Baby I don't care
No I don't care any more
You love me, boy

Song Connections/Remixes

None.

Trivia

  • This song also appeared on Dance Dance Revolution ULTRAMIX 2.

Music Production Notes

When I decided to make a song for 6th style, there was something I just had to try - a collaboration with all the VJs. When I made the suggestion at a staff meeting, everyone was enthusiastic about it, and so we were able to realize this idea.

"It doesn't matter how, create your material any way you like!"

And with that, I began to write a song ... The images the VJs came up with had no preconceptions to them, it was very stimulating. I composed a song that divided itself into several genres, in order to allow a sort of recital contest among shiro, HES, GOLI, and VJ GYO.

shiro was Techno, HES was Trance, GOLI had Drum'n'bass, and VJ GYO got 2Step. Again, I wanted to do something without seeing the movie, so I scattered sound effects everywhere that suited the theme of different parts coming together. Get it? The title of this song is a tribute to our beloved four-person "VJ army". This song becomes quite heated during the course of game play, as well, so I hope you all enjoy it.

Video Production Notes

shiro

The others seem to have drawn up their materials while listening to some sort of background music, but mine were all drawn during periods of long silence. good-cool, your music fit my vision perfectly. Thank you.

HES

Since we were allowed to do whatever we want, I was able to finish without ever really worrying about what I was doing, but when it came time to put the four pieces together, everyone seemed to worry ... "Is this okay?" *g*

However, there was no need to worry. The completed version flows together as one piece. Just what I'd expect from good-cool! You're the man!

To good-cool and the rest of the VJs, great work!

*shwiiiish, clang!*

GOLI

I was really worried about this for a while. Who makes a movie without hearing the song? But when the song was finished and we could listen to it, everyone kept saying "Man, that's really cool!" How can he make a single work that way, out of all these different pieces? But when you see the result, that worry crumbles away, and a new, wondrous feeling is born from your gasps of awe. When I had sound put to my own scene, it felt ... like something altogether new. Like levelling up. I couldn't help but think, "The power of sound is really something," with all of my being. good-cool, thank you very much.

VJ GYO

This time, I was in charge of the denoument. (If your gauge dropped 'cause you were watching the girl in the movie ... sorry.)

VJ GYO: "Shouldn't we start working on the video now if we want it to flow together right?"
good-cool: "Nah, it'd be neat if the four of you just worked it out on your own."

good-cool was always confident as he played mediator to my worries. And so, we were selected (or was it volunteered?) to fight the battle for the Beatmania IIDX specialty "What the hell's this?" style of movie making.

A lot of the staff were thinking the same thing. Even dj TAKA, who is familiar with good-cool's ability, would say things like, "I think this could make three really good songs, but ... " With that comment, our work was cut out for us. According to the rumors on the grapevine, it seems even good-cool was bewildered by this unorthodox approach at first. Still, in the end, I have to say it turned out really well. I think I could have made a movie better suited to lots of sound effects if I'd tried, though. *g*

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